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Why I Read!

BOOK POWER

by Gwendolyn Brooks

 

BOOKS FEED AND CURE AND CHORTLE AND COLLIDE
 
In all this willful world
of thud and thump and thunder 
man’s relevance to books continues to declare. 


Books are meat and medicine 
and flame and flight and flower,
steel, stitch, and cloud and clout, 
and drumbeats in the air.

Double Book Launchs with Rebecca Rosenblum and Mark Sampson

June 29, 2017 • 6:30 PM • Confederation Centre Library

So Much Love

By Rebecca Rosenblum
Finalist for the First Novel Award

Olive Kitteridge meets Room and The Lovely Bones in this stunning first novel about the unexpected reverberations the abduction of a young woman has on a small community.


Rebecca Rosenblum is the author of two acclaimed short story collections, The Big Dream and Once, winner of the Metcalf-Rooke Award and named one of Quill & Quire’s “15 Books That Mattered in 2008.” Her fiction has been shortlisted for the Journey Prize, the National Magazine Awards, and the Danuta Gleed Literary Award. She lives in Toronto. So Much Love is her first novel.

 

The Slip
by Mark Sampson


In this wickedly funny novel, one bad afternoon and two regrettable comments make the inimitable Philip Sharpe go viral for all the worst reasons.

Dr. Philip Sharpe, absent-minded professor extraordinaire, teaches philosophy at the University of Toronto and is one of Canada’s most combative public intellectuals. But when a live TV debate with his fiercest rival goes horribly off the rails, an oblivious Philip says some things to her that he really shouldn’t have.

As a clip of Philip’s “slip” goes viral, it soon reveals all the cracks and fissures in his marriage with his young, stay-at-home wife, Grace. And while the two of them try to get on the same side of the situation, things quickly spiral out of control.

Can Philip make amends and save his marriage? Is there any hope of salvaging his reputation? To do so, he’ll need to take a hard look at his on-air comments, and to conscript a band of misfits in a scheme to set things right.

Islander, Mark Sampson is the author of the novels Off BookSad Peninsula, and The Slip, as well as a short-story collection, The Secrets men Keep, and a poetry collection, Weathervane. He has published fiction and poetry in literary journals across Canada. Mark currrently lives in Toronto.


 

Tides:The Science and Spirit of the Ocean

A global journey through the science and wonder of the oceans
July 10, 2017 • 5 PM • The Confederation Centre Of The Arts Charlottetown

 
In Tides, writer, sailor, and surfer Jonathan White takes readers across the globe to discover the science and spirit of ocean tides. In the Arctic, White shimmies under the ice with an Inuit elder to hunt for mussels in the dark cavities left behind at low tide; in China, he races the Silver Dragon, a twenty-five-foot tidal bore that crashes eighty miles up the Qiantang River; in France, he interviews the monks that live in the tide-wrapped monastery of Mont Saint-Michel; in Chile and Scotland, he investigates the growth of tidal power generation; and in Panama and Venice, he delves into how the threat of sea level rise is changing human culture—the very old and very new. Tides combines lyrical prose, colorful adventure travel, and provocative scientific inquiry into the elemental, mysterious paradox that keeps our planet’s waters in constant motion. Photographs, scientific figures, line drawings, and sixteen color photos dramatically illustrate this engaging, expert tour of the tides.

Jonathan enjoys speaking to audiences of all kinds. He has given talks and keynote presentations at museums, aquariums, yacht clubs, government institutions, book clubs, writing conferences, grade schools, bookstores, and universities. Examples include the Seattle Center for Wooden Boats, the SeaDoc Society, the Northwest Straits Marine Conservation Initiative, The Evergreen State College, Orcas Island High School, and the Padilla Bay Marine Reserve. Sailors, surfers, fishers, divers, kayakers, and beachcombers all know the importance of time and tide, but most people don’t know how complex and poetic the phenomenon is. How do you explain, for example, that the tide is twenty-eight feet on the west side of Panama and only ten inches on the east side? Or that some places see one tide a day, while others see two or even six tides a day? What’s a double high tide, or a double low tide? These are among the topics Jonathan has fun describing, illustrated with photographs and stories — and always in simple, accessible language that emphasizes the tide’s mystery and beauty.

Co-Sponsored By The Nature Conservancy Of Canada And The Confederation Centre For The Arts

The Vimy Trap or, How We Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Great War

July 13, 2017 • 7 PM • PEI Regiment Museum • 3 Havilland Street, Charlottetown

 

Join us for a stimulating presentation by Kingston writer Jamie Swift. Jamie is the author of numerous books. He works on social justice issues for the Sisters of Providence of St. Vincent de Paul and lectures at the Smith School of Business at Queen’s University.

Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing, 2017 (Short-listed)
Sir John A. Macdonald Prize, 2017 (Short-listed)


The story of the bloody 1917 Battle of Vimy Ridge is, according to many of today’s tellings, a heroic founding moment for Canada. This noble, birth-of-a-nation narrative is regularly applied to the Great War in general. Yet this mythical tale is rather new. “Vimyism”— today’s official story of glorious, martial patriotism—contrasts sharply with the complex ways in which veterans, artists, clerics, and even politicians who had supported the war interpreted its meaning over the decades.
​​​​​​​
Was the Great War a futile imperial debacle? A proud, nation-building milestone? Contending Great War memories have helped to shape how later wars were imagined. The Vimy Trap provides a powerful probe of commemoration cultures. This subtle, fast-paced work of public history—combining scholarly insight with sharp-eyed journalism, and based on primary sources and school textbooks, battlefield visits and war art—explains both how and why peace and war remain contested terrain in ever-changing landscapes of Canadian memory.